Whither cross-Strait relations?

Taiwan opposition leader and president-elect Tsai Ing-wen, speaks after receiving the certificate from Central Election Commission being elected as President, in Taipei, Taiwan. (Photo: AAP)

Authors: Hoo Tiang Boon and James Char, RSIS

What does the victory of the independence-leaning Democratic Progressive Party’s (DPP) Tsai Ing-wen in Taiwan’s presidential election mean for cross-Strait relations? Today’s Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) is a considerably different political animal to former president Chen Shui-bian’s DPP. Read more…

Tsai’s diplomatic dilemmas

In this photo taken Jan. 16, 2016, Taiwan's Democratic Progressive Party, DPP, presidential candidate, Tsai Ing-wen, waves as she declares victory in the presidential election in Taipei, Taiwan. (Photo: AAP)

Author: Kwei-Bo Huang, National Chengchi University

After a historic, overwhelming election victory on 16 January, the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) led by Tsai Ing-wen will dominate Taiwan’s executive and legislative branches starting on 20 May.

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Taiwan’s premier question

Motorist drive past campaign banner of Taiwan’s Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) presidential candidate Tsai Ing-wen, on the eve of 2016 presidential election in Taipei, Taiwan. (Photo: AAP)

Author: Chen-shen Yen, National Chengchi University

On 16 January, Taiwan will go to the polls to elect members of parliament and a new president. With three major presidential candidates competing for the highest office and 18 parties vying for seats in the parliament, the election may result in a unified or a divided government.

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Crumbling KMT opens the door for DPP government

Tsai Ing-wen, presidential candidate of Taiwan's Democratic Progressive Party, is stumping for her campaign in Taipei, Taiwan, 13 January 2016. (Photo: AAP).

Author: Fu-Kuo Liu, National Chengchi University

Taiwan’s general elections are scheduled for 16 January 2016, but their outcome has been obvious for some time. While the new president and makeup of the Legislative Yuan will surprise few, the elections will have profound implications for regional security and cross-Strait relations. Read more…

Taiwan’s political choice

Supporters of Taiwan's Democratic Progressive Party presidential candidate Tsai Ing-wen cheer as she speaks during a large campaign rally in Kaohsiung, Taiwan on 9 January 2016. Taiwan will hold its presidential election on 16 January. (Photo: AAP).

Author: Peter Drysdale, East Asia Forum

On Sunday, Taiwan will elect its next president, the successor to President Ma Ying-jeou from the Kuomintang (KMT) party who has been in power for the past eight years and is ineligible to run for another term. The vote will almost certainly record a decisive choice for political change. Read more…

What a Tsai presidency could mean for cross-Strait relations

Supporters of Taiwan's Democratic Progressive Party presidential candidate Tsai Ing-wen hold flags as they listen to her speak during a large campaign rally in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, on 9 January 2016. Taiwan will hold its presidential election on 16 January. (Photo: AAP).

Author: Mark Harrison, University of Tasmania

On 16 January Taiwan will elect a new president and legislative assembly. The presidential candidates for the two main parties are Eric Chu for the ruling Kuomintang (KMT) and Tsai Ing-wen for the opposition Democratic Progressive Party (DPP). Tsai’s polling numbers are more than 20 points above Chu’s. Read more…

Economics will determine Taiwan election

A supporter of Taiwan's Democratic Progressive Party presidential candidate Tsai Ing-wen holds her portrait and a slogan that reads ‘Change’ as Tsai visits a temple in Taipei, Taiwan, 6 January 2016. (Photo: AAP).

Author: Jean Yu-Chen Tseng

The campaign for Taiwan’s upcoming presidential election on 16 January 2016 is one of the most surprising in the island’s political history. In past presidential elections, candidates mainly campaigned on divisive ideological issues such as Taiwanese self-identification and whether Taiwan should become independent or unify with mainland China. Read more…