China–ROK maritime boundary talks can foster safer seas

South Korean destroyer Yulgok YiYi patrols in waters around Ieodo, south of Jeju Island, South Korea, 2 December 2013. (Photo: AAP).

Author: Sukjoon Yoon, KIMS

Talks between China and South Korea on boundary delimitation in the Yellow Sea offer a chance to improve bilateral relations and the prospect of extending the agreement to other seas, in particular the South China Sea. Read more…

Regional strategic context improves Australia–Vietnam relations

Vietnam's Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung and Australia's Prime Minister Tony Abbott shake hands during a joint press conference, 18 March 2015. (Photo: AAP)

Author: Derek McDougall, University of Melbourne

Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung’s visit to Australia in mid-March 2015 has highlighted how Australia–Vietnam relations relate to the broader strategic picture in the Asia Pacific. Read more…

The US and Vietnam go from mutual ‘menace’ to mates

US President Barack Obama and Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung attend their bilateral meeting held on the sidelines of the ASEAN summit in Naypyitaw, Myanmar, 13 November 2015. (Photo: AAP).

Author: Hung Nguyen, George Mason University

US–Vietnam relations have come a long way. In 1982, in his report to the Fifth Congress of the Communist Party of Vietnam (CPV), Secretary-General Le Duan claimed that US–China collusion constituted ‘a factor constantly threatening world peace, and especially seriously menacing security and stability in Asia’. Read more…

AIIB miles ahead of TPP in promoting integration

US President Barack Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping head for their bilateral meeting in California on 7 June 2013. The United States is currently attempting to thwart the China-led AIIB by completing the TPP. (Photo: AAP).

Author: Andrew Elek, ANU

The Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) is a far more economically efficient option than the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) for integrating Asian economies to each other and to the rest of the world. While the United States is attempting to thwart China’s AIIB by completing the TPP, it is likely to result in net costs to countries other than the US. Read more…

Why India needs to ‘act’ East

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi speaks during the 12th ASEAN-India summit in Naypyitaw, Myanmar, 12 November 2014. (Photo: AAP).

Author: Tridivesh Singh Maini, Jindal School of International Affairs

Ever since former prime minister P.V. Narasimha Rao reshaped India’s foreign policy in the 1990s under the so-called ‘Look East’ policy India has strengthened ties with Southeast Asia. The current government of Prime Minister Narendra Modi has unequivocally said that it is keen to progress from the ‘Look East’ policy to ‘Act East.’ Read more…

Why the RCEP is the opportunity India needs

Indian fruit vendors wait for customers as they sell bananas on the roadside in Amritsar on 1 April 2015. (Photo: AAP)

Authors: Bipul Chatterjee and Kyle Robert Cote, CUTS International

As two mega-regional preferential trade agreements — the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) — loom closer to completion, India must move towards higher trade standards. Trade diversion from non-member countries of these mega-regional trade agreements is likely to occur and could be detrimental. This is a serious concern for developing countries cut out of the talks. Read more…

A new vision for China–Australia relations

Chinese President Xi Jinping and Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott walk together as they leave the House of Representatives at Parliament House in Canberra, 17 November 2014. (Photo: AAP).

Author: Stuart Harris, ANU

Australia’s foreign policy has been a mix of positives and negatives under the Liberal-National Coalition government, as was true of the previous Labor government. Former prime ministers Gough Whitlam and Bob Hawke recognised the need for Australia to think strategically about future regional developments, and John Howard’s thinking gradually moved in that direction. Read more…